Pier fishing is for the birds

In the 60 years since my grandfather taught me how to fish, I have fished in almost every way that you can fish (the exception being fly fishing). 

I have fished freshwater in boats, on the shore, and from fishing docks.  I have fished saltwater in boats, on the shore, and from piers.  In all of these venues I never encountered the “problems” with birds like you have when pier fishing in whatever ocean you happen to be near.  Freshwater fishing never has a problem with birds and ocean fishing never has a problem with them either unless you are on a “party boat” that is releasing offal to attract fish.  This also attracts Sea Gulls but in that arena, they usually don’t bother the fishermen, they want the offal, not your bait.   

Don’t get me wrong, in most instances I love having seabirds around because if they are out over the water, they tell you that there are fish in the area and where you can find them.  Pelicans are especially good at this which is why I love them.  When people come up and talk to me about fishing while I am on the pier, I often mention the birds and how they can tell you if the day will be a good one or a bad one for fishing.  Most people, especially fishermen, don’t think this way. 

Following is a short list of birdlife I see most often on piers followed by their pluses and minuses.  Keep in mind that I love them all though some can be very pesky and one species can totally ruin a day of fishing.

  • Pelicans – As I said above, I love Pelicans.  They are an unwieldy looking bird whose beaks are almost as long as their bodies yet when in flight they look in perfect symmetry, everything about them is as it should be.  When a flock of them come in flying just above water as they hunt for schools of fish, you wonder how such a ponderous looking creature can fly with such precision.  When they spot their prey and begin striking the water one after another, you have to cheer for them.  You also know exactly where the fish are.
  • Sea Gulls…  – …are always a nuisance.  When they are not trying to steal your catch, they are sneaking up behind you trying to steal your bait.  They don’t have much luck with me because I always keep my bait in sealed containers and I always secure my catch (unless distracted by the landing of a 5-foot Tiger Shark).  Still, you have to watch for them because they are fearless and may try to pull the cover off of your bait (I have seen this happen).  They can really distract you from fishing.  Still, when they are acting like real seabirds, they can hunt for fish like Pelicans do, so they tell you where the fish are located. 
  • Pigeons While not a seabird they are usually the most abundant of feathered friends on piers.  Though they will snatch up an unattended piece of bait, they are not aggressive about it and most of the time they just get underfoot.  The problem with them is they also get under the pier, in flight.  With so many of them around, it is not unusual to see one of them accidentally strike a line.  In an earlier blog post I detail how I “caught” one.
  • Western Jackdaws I am not an ornithologist so I am guessing what this species is.  They look like shrunken crows and I found out that they are related to crows; they can also be as pesky as a Sea Gull.  They are cute little things and you almost want to feed them but feeding wild animals is never a good idea because you don’t want any of them to become dependent on a human provided food supply.  Unlike pigeons who stroll about and get underfoot, these little birds hop all over the pier looking for anything they can steal for a meal.  I usually have a small supply of cut bait ready to go so I can get my line in the water right away after losing a piece of it to nibblers.  I have taken to putting a cloth over these bits of bait just because of these birds.  Unlike Sea Gulls they are so small and quick and there is no way you can monitor your bait to keep them from stealing it.    
  • Cormorants These simply amazing birds “fly” underwater just a easily as they do while in the air.  When they are around, you know there are fish around too.  They can also very easily ruin a day of fishing.  Unlike all the previous birds, you rarely see a Cormorant on the pier, they are birds of the water and that is where they prefer to be.  The problem with them is they not only will try to steal your catch as you are reeling it in, they ALSO will go after your bait and if you use a drift line like I do, that can be a huge problem because the last thing you want to do is catch one of these birds.  What’s more is that you don’t always see them when you cast out even if you are looking for them.  They can be submerged, see your bait hit the water and be after it with astonishing speed.  Last week there were several of them lurking about the pier I was on and no matter what I did, I could not dodge them.  I finally gave up and went in early.    
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